en-USde-DE

PlantDetails

Annual herbs: Dill (Dill weed) 

  Back

Umbellifers


Annual herbs: Dill (Dill weed)
glyphicon <%# Eval("Title") %> Seeding: from mid March to beginning of September (The time to sow seeds depends upon whether you would like to harvest dill seeds or the green dill weed. Harvesting from seeds: Early sowing.[br /] Only harvest green leaves: Late sowing. Dill can be cultivated in the same location for 4 years. Tip:[br /] Only grow dill at one small location and the next year plant it a bit further into the row.)
glyphicon <%# Eval("Title") %> Planting: from May to September (Good neighbours:[br /] Peas, cucumbers, carrots, onions, beans, cabbage, garlic, beetroot.)
glyphicon <%# Eval("Title") %> Distance: 35.00 cm x 10.0 cm
glyphicon <%# Eval("Title") %> Harvest: If sown: 6 weeks after seeding, if planted: 4 weeks after planting. Not before May and not after October
glyphicon <%# Eval("Title") %> Good Neighbours: Kale, Strawberries
glyphicon <%# Eval("Title") %> You do not need to plant a bed just with one herb; try planting one main herb and include some others which you would like.
garten feinde

 

  • Basil:
    This is a herb. It belongs to the mint or deadnettle family (Lamiaceae)
    There are several varieties of basil. It is mostly red basil, lemon basil and Thai basil which are used in cooking, with each one having distinctly different aromas.
  • Summer savory:
    It belongs to the mint or deadnettle family (Lamiaceae).
    It is often a heavily branched annual herbaceous plant with a strong main root that grows to a height of about 30 cm. Summer savory has fleshy green leaves and delicate pink flowers.
  • Borage:
    This belongs to the borage or forget-me-not family (Boraginaceae), which in turn belongs to the mint or deadnettle family (Lamiaceae).
    Borage grows to a height of about one metre. It has small blue star-shaped flowers.
    It frequently grows wild on moist meadows and on the banks of streams.

    'Scientists warn about eating dill weed. This is because it naturally contains poisons which can damage the liver and can even be carcinogenic .'
  • Dill:
    belongs to the umbellifer family (Apiaceae).
    Dill is used as a herb and for medicinal purposes. The plant has an aromatic scent.



  • Nasturtium:
    Belongs to the Brassicales family.
    It grows either as a climbing plant or as a ground cover plant. In its home, the plant is biennial. Nasturtium flowers (yellow, orange or red) and leaves are edible.
    Nasturtium is a suitable plant for fennel, kohlrabi, radish and celery as well as for apple trees (aphids) and for peach tree wilt.
  • Chervil:
    This forms its own genus within the umbellifer family of plants.
    Chervil can grow to a height of up to 60 cm and is a close relative to parsley and carrots.
    The smell of chervil discourages ants, aphids, mildew and snails.
  • Coriander:
    This belongs to the umbellifer family (Apiaceae).
    Coriander leaves look similar to parsley.
    This plant occurs naturally in Europe, Asia and America. It grows to a height of 30 to 70 cm.
  • Marjoram:
    This belongs to the mint or deadnettle family.
    Majoram is used as a spice and for medicinal purposes with small, lush green oval leaves and it grows to a height of about 80 cm.

 

Annual herbs do better if they are moved to a new location each year.
Annual herbs should never be planted next to biennial or perennial herbs.

  • Basil:
    This needs a site in full sun, with a moist soil which is rich in nutrients.
  • Summer savory:
    Location in full sun, protected from the wind with loose, light, alkali soil.
  • Borage:
    Sunny location with moist, well drained soil.
  • Dill:
    Sunny or partially shaded location with a loose, chalky garden soil.
  • Nasturtium:
    Sunny or partially shaded location with a sandy, very well drained soil.
    Nasturtium will even flourish in dark spots beneath trees or other shady places.
  • Chervil:
    Ideally it should be in partial shade. It can withstand sunny locations but not the full, hot midday sun.
  • Coriander:
    Sunny to very sunny location with sandy, very well drained soil.
  • Marjoram:
    In full sun with well broken up, well drained, good garden soil.
    Only grow for three to four years at one location.
    You do not need to plant a whole bed with marjoram. Just grow it at one corner and move it a little further along the row in the following year.

 

  • Basil:
    This can be propagated by seeds, cuttings and by root division.
    Basil needs light to germinate which means that the seeds must not be covered with soil.
    Its seeds should always be kept moist, so cover the seedbed with some sort of transparent sheeting with small holes.
    Perennial varieties of basil can be propagated using cuttings, by cutting off a few stalks and putting them into a container of water until roots form.
  • Summer savory:
    This can be propagated by sowing seeds.
  • Borage:
    Is always propagated by seed.
    It requires darkness to germinate so cover the seeds well with soil.
    Tip:
    Once you have planted borage do not move it as it may react very badly.
  • Dill:
    Dill seeds can be sown directly into the bed.
    Dill flourishes best as a single plant.
    You can spread dill seeds over your garden and simply remove the excess seedlings.
    Once sown, dill will propagate itself in your garden.
    The time to sow depends upon whether you would like to harvest dill seeds or dill weed (the green leaves).
    If you would like to harvest the seeds, then you should sow early.
    If you would only like to harvest the green leaves then you can also sow later.

    Take note that its roots are very sensitive about being replanted.
    Tip:
    To be able to continuously harvest dill, sow seeds at several successive intervals of time.
  • Nasturtium:
    This can be propagated by sowing seeds.
  • Chervil:
    This can be propagated by sowing seeds.
  • Coriander:
    This can be propagated by sowing seeds.
  • Marjoram:
    This can be propagated by sowing seeds.

 

Kale, Strawberries

 

 

Plants that are well suited for next year cultivation:

(not specified)

 

The following plants should not be planted in the following years:

How many years: Not to plant:
3 year(s) Annual herbs, Carrots, Celery, Fennel, Lovage, Parsley, Parsnips, Perennial umbellifer herbs
2 year(s) Radish

 

Not applicable. The annual plants grow, flower and produce seeds in the first year and then die off.
Basil should be moved to a warmer environment as soon as the temperature drops below 10°C. In central Europe it is almost to impossible to get basil to overwinter.

 

  • Basil:
    Regularly water directly into the soil, and never allow to dry out completely.
    Only fertilise sparingly.
  • Summer savory:
    Water sufficiently and regularly.
    To encourage growth, in spring you can cut summer savory back a little.
  • Borage:
    This has no special requirements:
    - Water regularly - Hoe weeds and loosen up the soil.
    Tip:
    Borage is not suitable for cultivation in pots as it produces roots which quickly grow past the base of the pot.
  • Dill:
    Does not like being replanted as its roots can be very sensitive.
    The soil must not dry out.
    Dill only develops very slowly so the remaining spaces can quickly fill with weeds. Tip:
    Mark the rows of seeds with small sticks or with plants which grow quickly such as radish.
  • Nasturtium:
    - Water regularly. Do not allow the soil to dry out. - Mulch with compost and organic fertiliser (e.g. horn shavings)
  • Chervil:
    This is not suitable for companion planting as it does not like sharing a bed with other types of vegetable.
  • Coriander:
    - Water regularly. Do not allow the soil to dry out.
  • Marjoram:
    - Walter regularly, especially young plants but do not allow standing water to develop.
    - Regularly hoe weeds.
Tips:
  • Annual herbs do better if they are moved to a new location each year.
  • Annual herbs should never be planted next to biennial or perennial herbs.

 

  • Basil:
    Pests: Slugs
    Control:
    Lay out strips of black sheeting between the rows of seeds in the vegetable bed.
    Slugs like to sneak under this sheeting and they are they are then easy to remove.
    Water with a solution of elder leaves, bracken and fern, spray a coffee solution onto the plants. Diseases: Downy mildew (a fungal disease) encouraged by wet leaves.
    Preventative measures: When watering, try not to wet the leaves if possible. Control: Cut off affected leaves to prevent the fungus from spreading.
    This acts against mildew and whiteflies.
  • Summer savory:
    Pests: Green tortoise beetle, black bean aphid
    Control:
    Generously remove all affected areas. Diseases: Rust, mildew, grey mould. These are caused by the wrong location and/or too much or too little water.
  • Borage:
    Pests: Aphids,whiteflies.
    Control:
    If the insect attack is not too heavy, hit will help to spray down the plants two to three times per week with cold water.
  • Dill:
    Pests: Nematodes, aphids, true bugs.
    Control: Cut the plant down and remove the top layer of soil with the pests' larvae. Tip:
    Dill, planted between other herbs or type of vegetables will keep pests away.
  • Nasturtium:
    Pests: The cabbage white butterfly caterpillar, aphids.
    Tip:
    nasturtium can be used as an "aphid catcher" to keep them away from other plants, as aphids really like to settle on nasturtiums.
  • Chervil:
    Pests: Aphids, depressaria chaerophylli moths, carrot aphid.
    Diseases: Powdery mildew, wilt, rust fungus
    Control:
    To combat mildew every second day spary all affected parts of the plant with an 8 : 10 milk-water solution.
  • Coriander:
    Pests: Leaf bugs.
    Diseases: Umbel wilt, yellow wilt and powdery mildew.
  • Marjoram:
    Pests: Aphids, caterpillars
    Control:
    Generously remove all affected areas.

 

  • Basil:
    Is ready to harvest about 8 weeks are sowing. Basil is harvested by breaking off entire shoots but not too low down. This also encourages bushy growth.
  • Summer savory:
    Is ready to harvest as soon as it starts to flower, from about the 12th week after sowing. It has then reached its best, not too spicy aroma.
    Use a knife to cut off the plant about 10 cm over the ground.
  • Borage:
    The young plants are fully grown only 40 days after sowing .
    Borage leaves can be harvested continuously after about 40 days and the flowers after 70 days from sowing.
  • Dill:
    Just before fully mature, cut off the dill's complete umbel.
    The ripeness of the seeds can be seen when they turn a brown colour.
    Dill should be harvested gradually, so that the plant has sufficient time to grow again.
    Leaves can be harvested continuously for 5 months from the 6th week after sowing. Seeds can be harvested for one month from the 26th week after sowing.
  • Nasturtium:
    New flowers will be continually produced from the 8th week after sowing until the first frost. That means a plentiful harvest.
  • Chervil:
    Is harvested from about the 8th week after sowing until the first frost.
  • Coriander:
    Needs about 24 weeks from sowing until it can be harvested.
  • Marjoram:
    Is best harvested while flowering which usually starts about 12 weeks after sowing and lasts for about 8 weeks, as the plant has its best aroma during this phase.
The best time to harvest is just before or during flowering as most herbs for the kitchen then have the highest levels of aroma.

 

  • Basil:
    This should not be dried or frozen.
    As basil's aroma quickly disappears when dried, it should be preserved in oil.
  • Summer savory:
    This can be frozen or dried. Dried or frozen, summer savory keeps its aroma.
  • Borage:
    You should not keep this.
    The blue borage flowers can be conserved in vinegar.
  • Dill:
    Fresh dill can be kept In a plastic bag in the fridge for 3 to 4 days.
    Dill freezes well. Chop it finely and, with a little water, freeze it in ice cube trays.
    Dried leaves and seeds are less aromatic than fresh so keep them in an airtight container in a cool and dark place.
  • Nasturtium:
    This wilts relatively quickly and is difficult to dry or freeze.
  • Chervil:
    This can be kept for a few days in the fridge.
    When dried, it should be kept in an airtight container in a cool, dark place.
    Chervil's taste is mostly lost by drying or freezing so it is best used fresh.
  • Coriander:
    You can keep this for 3 to 4 days in the fridge.
    Wrapped in a freezer bag it will keep fresh for about a week in the fridge.
    To freeze it, wash it and dab dry. Spread around a sheet and put in the freezer.
    When the coriander is frozen, put it in small plastic dishes.
  • Majoram :
    You can keep this for 3 to 4 days in the fridge.
    Majoram can be dried. To dry it, hang all of the shoots upside down.
    Keep dried marjoram in a dark, cool place. When dried, it will keep for several years.
    It can be frozen. To freeze, coarsely chop the marjoram, put into ice cube trays and freeze.

 

  • Basil:
    Its taste is spicy, strong and slightly bitter.
    Basil should not be cooked.
    It goes well with tomatoes, aubergines, paprikas, tomato sauce, mozzarella, soups, antipasti, summer salad.
  • Summer savory:
    This is used as a herb for bean, lamb and mushroom dishes as well as stews and salads and greasy dishes (briefly cook the stems and leaves with the dish). Adding summer savory to greasy dishes makes the food easier to digest.
  • Borage:
    Borage tasts a bit like cucumber.
    It goes with vegetables, salads, minced meat and roast goose.
    Borage flowers are edible. It can be used fresh to decorate salads or candied to decorate sweets.
  • Dill:
    This is used as a herb for pale sauces, mayonnaise, remoulades, chicken and veal ragouts, fish, prawns, lobsters and crabs.
    It also goes well with cucumbers, courgettes, beans and salads.
    It has the effect of promoting germination and discourages insect pests.
  • Nasturtium:
    The leaves and the flowers are edible and they are a little bit spicy.
    It has medicinal properties and helps with colds, coughs and urinary tract infections.
  • Chervil:
    This tastes somewhat like parsley and liquorice.
    Goes well with soups, sauces, potatoes, carrots, asparagus, tomatoes, curd cheese and salads.
  • Coriander:
    Tastes like aniseeed, is slightly sweet.
    Goes well with
    • Asian dishes
    • Meat (poultry, pork and mutton, game)
    • Vegetables (rice, cabbage, carrots)
    • Cakes
    • Stewed apples.
    Tip:
    1-2 freshly ground coriander seeds give coffee a very particular flavour.
  • Marjoram:
    Majoram has a spicy, bitter taste.
    It is used to spice potatoes, sausage, minced meat, liver and roast goose.
    Goes well with beans, carrots and mushrooms.
Tips:
  • Only mix freshly chopped marjoram into the finished dish at the end.
  • Dried marjoram should be cooked for a few minutes with the dish.
  •  



    Location of your garden:   (Unknown Address)